Arthur Cormack’s solo recording career recently emerged from a 30-year hiatus, during which time he was nevertheless responsible for the release of 55 albums.

‘Buanas’ (endurance) was released last year and Arthur gets the first chance to take the songs ‘on tour’ this summer when he appears at the award-winning Hebridean Celtic Festival on Lewis and Harris.

Arthur Cormack and Friends will be on stage at An Lanntair arts centre in Stornoway on Saturday, 21 July and in Tarbert on the previous evening as part of the festival’s community programme.

A critically acclaimed multimedia production featuring renowned Scots performers including Barbara Dickson and Siobhan Miller will visit the Aros Centre on Friday 31 August as part of a commemorative tour of Scotland to mark the centenary of World War One.

Forming part of Scotland’s Armistice centenary programme, Far, Far From Ypres uses the songs of the trenches to tell the story of the Scottish war effort and will visit ten venues across the country throughout the centenary of the final hundred days of the war. The tour is being delivered by WW100 Scotland in partnership with Legion Scotland and Poppyscotland.

The show was devised, written and produced by Ian McCalman of folk group The McCalmans to highlight the unique insight the songs offer into the life of a soldier. It shares the hope, suffering, endurance and fear associated with the war through the eyes of fictional, prototypical soldier, Jimmy MacDonald.  Like many young men, Jimmy is full of enthusiasm and joins up right away, however, when he is sent to the Flanders trenches he begins to experience the true horrors of war.

Ian McCalman commented: “During the war, soldiers sang together to bond and alleviate fear, sharing songs from contemporary music halls as well as creating their own. However, looking back on the music of the war today, we can see how attitudes towards the conflict changed over its course. From the early, jingoistic songs that promoted recruitment and betrayed an innocence about the reality of war, through to the resignation, black humour and resentment present in the later songs, the progression reflects the bitterness which grew among troops as they became disenchanted.

"Are teenage dreams so hard to beat?" (photo credit Philip Solovjov)

An exhibition exploring our formative years will come to Skye.

The contrasts of adolescence past and present will be examined, as comparatively tame and nostalgic teenage magazines are exhibited next to the never-ending clickbait of internet culture.

The exhibition is brought to Skye by the Travelling Gallery, a contemporary art gallery that brings contemporary art straight to you.

Our teenage dreams will be suspended as the exhibition looks at our prolonged adolescence and why 'teenage' no longer just refers to the period between the ages of 12 and 20.

The exhibition will include work by contemporary artists Arpita Shah, Alice Theobald and Holly White alongside archive material from Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh.

Celebrating its 40th year, the Travelling Gallery is a mobile art space inside a custom-built, bus, which brings high quality contemporary art exhibitions and events to schools and communities throughout Scotland.

The exhibition will come to Café Sia on Saturday 28 April from 10am to 5pm.

photo credit Travelling Gallery