Mark Beaumont

Around the World in Eighty Days is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne published in 1873.

In the story Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the World in 80 days on a £20,000 wager set by his friends at the Reform Club.

Now, more than 144 years later, endurance athlete Mark Beaumont is capturing that same spirit of adventure with the Artemis World Cycle, his Record Breaking quest to cycle around the World in 80 days.

As a warm up to the Artemis World Cycle, he will first cycle around the coastline of Britain, setting off on 4th April to cover 3,500 miles in 15 days.

And, with Mark due in Sleat as part of the warm up, newly established business and tourism organisation SkyeConnect are encouraging local folk to turn out on Wednesday 12 April and cheer him on his way. He is expected to be at Isle Ornsay/Eilean Iarmain at around 10am.

 Mark, best known for cycling around the world in 194 days in 2008, will take ultra-endurance to another level by circumnavigating the globe in less than half that time.Beaumont will be attempting to travel 18,000 miles around the world, starting from Paris on Sunday 2 July.

As part of his mission to travel around the world in 80 days, breaking the current world record of 123 days, set by New Zealand’s Andrew Nicholson, the Scottish adventurer is raising funds for Orkidstudio, which works to benefit communities worldwide through innovative architecture and construction. The journey will also be tracked through Twinkl, a global educational platform for primary schools.

“This is the culmination of the past two decades, since I was a 12-year-old boy cycling across Scotland,” says Beaumont. “I would love for this journey to give people the confidence to take on what they are capable, for young people in particular to stop and to think ‘what’s my 80 days’?”

 “I want to redefine the limits of human endurance by proving what seems impossible really is possible. After capsizing in the Atlantic, I gave up being an athlete for a couple of years, and enjoyed making documentaries about other athletes – but in truth I had unfinished business, I couldn’t idly watch others push their limits. I am excited and nervous about what lies ahead, it truly is unchartered territory.”